Friday, 20 April 2018

Pandesal

MEGA BLOGGING MARATHON - APRIL 2018
#87 BLOGGING MARATHON

THEME: EXPLORE THE FLAVORS  - INTERNATIONAL BREAKFAST
DAY 16

"Breakfast like a King, Lunch like a Prince and Dine like a Pauper"

   As we're fast approaching towards the end, a few of my recipes are not ready and am fighting for time to make them. I had an idea what I wanted to make but some got left undone as I went away on a family holiday. Now with daily routine, water issues, inviting guests over for dinners and tomorrow have to make idli sambhar for my Lions Club dinner (nearly 20 people), I'm yet to make my breakfast dish with Q.  The only way I can see myself making that tomorrow in between steaming idlis and simmering sambhar is perhaps serve it to hubby for lunch. He somehow enjoys his porridge with fresh fruits and nuts from Monday to Saturday and Sunday has to be a cereal day. He can eat the same food every single day. Me on the other hand, I want variety. 

   Anyway, lets get talking about today's breakfast and worry about Q tomorrow. Today is it P for Pandesal from the PHILIPPINES. Pandesal literally means bread of salt. These rolls are typically served with coffee and accompanied with butter, cheese, jam or peanut butter. These rolls are a Spanish version of the French baguette. The Philippines was once a Spanish colony.

   Though the name is pandesal, bread of salt, it actually tastes sweeter. The rolls are soft and because they are coated with bread crumbs before baking, the crust is crispy when warm. Next day the rolls tend to become soft but when toasted taste heavenly.  These rolls reminded me of the pav rolls. Soft and buttery. 

  Since I started preparing the breakfast dishes butter and jam consumption has gone up. So for these rolls the jam had to stay in the fridge. Instead we enjoyed these rolls with some cheese. Next day hubby enjoyed the rolls with soup and I dunked mine in proper milky coffee. 






PANDESAL
Makes 12

3 cups plain flour(all purpose flour)
¾ cup warm milk
2 tsp dry active yeast 
1¼ tsp salt
¼ cup sugar
3 tbsp butter, at room temperature
1 egg, lightly beaten
½ cup bread crumbs

extra flour for dusting
extra butter for greasing

  1. If you're not using instant active dry yeast then you need to let it ferment for a while. Take some warm milk, add about 1 tsp sugar from the measured sugar. Mix well. Sprinkle the yeast over it. Cover and let it sit for 10 minutes till the mixture is frothy.
  2. Mix salt and sugar into the flour.
  3. Add the yeast mixture, the remaining milk, egg and butter.
  4. Mix the dough with a spatula or wooden spoon. Let it rest for 10-15 minutes.
  5. Sprinkle little flour on the worktop.
  6. Tip the dough onto the worktop and knead till you get a smooth and silky dough. The dough may be sticky but don't be tempted to add too much flour. Instead grease your hand with some butter.
  7. Shape the dough into a ball and return it to a greased bowl.
  8. Cover with a damp tea towel or cling film and let it rise till its double in size. Mine took  about 1 hour.
  9. Dust the worktop lightly with flour. Take the dough out of the bowl onto the worktop.
  10. Deflate it gently and divide it into 2.
  11. Roll each dough part into a log about 6" long. Roll both the logs in breadcrumbs.
  12. Slice the logs diagonally, about 1" thick. 
  13. Roll each piece again in breadcrumb and place it on a lined baking tray.
  14. At this point you can place the pandesal close to each other to make pull apart rolls or place them about an inch apart to make individual rolls.
  15. Let the rolls rise till they are double in size, about 45-50 minutes.
  16. Preheat the oven to 180°C.
  17. Bake the pandesal for 15 minutes or till the tops are golden brown.
  18. Remove the rolls from the oven. Let them cool down a bit on a wire rack.
  19. Serve warm pandesal with coffee, butter, jam, peanut butter or cheese. 
Tips:
  • Place the shaped rolls apart for individual rolls or close together to make a pull apart bread.
  • As you don't want chewy buns its best to use plain flour and not bread flour.
  • Don't be tempted to add more flour as the rolls may turn out dense.

A-Z breakfast Dishes:

A - Apple Aebleskiver - Denmark
B - Baghrir - Morocco
C - Changua - Colombia
D - Dutch Baby Pancakes - Germany/USA
E - English Breakfast - England
F - French Toast - Canada
G - Griddle/Girdle Scones - Scotland
H - Hafragrautur -  Iceland
I - Idiyappam - India
J - Johnnycakes - Caribbean Islands
K - Khabees - Bahrain
L - Lahooh - Somalia
M - Masoub - Saudi Arabia
N - Nasi Goreng - Indonesia
O - Oladushki - Russia

Check out what other Mega Blogging Marathoners have made for Day 16:

     
   


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Wednesday, 18 April 2018

Oladushki - Russian Pancakes

MEGA BLOGGING MARATHON - APRIL 2018
#87 BLOGGING MARATHON

THEME: EXPLORE THE FLAVORS  - INTERNATIONAL BREAKFAST
DAY 15

"Breakfast like a King, Lunch like a Prince and Dine like a Pauper"

   Today hubby took me out for lunch to a Chinese Restaurant which is at what all Kenyans know as Lighthouse. Its like recreational place by the sea. Looking over from the cliff, you can see the blue sea, watch ships passing by, enjoy roasted cassava, roasted sweet potatoes, roasted corn, fried cassava, cassava chips, coconut water, ice creams and lately boiled eggs, sodas, potato chips have been added. This is one place that no body leaves Mombasa without visiting. As you enter the famous Mama Ngina Drive as the road is called, from the ferry side, you'll be greeted by really big, fat trunked baobab trees. If you enter at the other end, you'll pass State House, the official Mombasa residence of the President and come to the famous Mombasa Golf Club, founded in 1911. Lighthouse has many fond memories for me. Its where we'd come with my cousins whenever we visited Mombasa. We'd walk all the way from their home, run around, enjoy cassava chips served in cone shaped newspaper and then walk back when it became dark. Pretty safe to walk back then. After my marriage, that's where hubby would take me when I had a serious craving for Choco Ice a vanilla chocolate ice cream sold by Lyons, brought to Lighthouse everyday in the afternoon by ice cream vendors pushing little white carts. Its where we've brought our kids when they were young, its where hubby and I have sat in the evenings to enjoy the cool breeze when we've had power cuts for long hours as our previous apartment would become like an oven. Its where my father in law and mother in law would meet up with friends every evening. Basically Lighthouse use to be full of life and you'd definitely meet someone you know.

   Nowadays the story is completely different. Its become so filthy, temporary structures with plastic, wood and stones are put up everywhere. Food is sold there and the surrounding is strewn with plastic bottles, papers, broken plastic chairs, stones, basically making the place very uninviting. Once I saw a tourist bus there and felt, that they were brought here so that they could see how as citizens of a beautiful country, we just don't know how to keep it clean and beautiful. I seen a few of the old baobab trees chopped down, matatu drivers, touts, and the youth idling around there have become a menace, banging on cars and windows. Tuktuks and matatus stop in the middle of the road. Just so much filth everywhere and no law and order. Its such a shame. Charity Clubs like Lions Clubs, Rotary, Round Table over the years have put in so much effort and money to make Lighthouse a place of relaxation for all but unfortunately Mombasa County has not taken it up on them to keep it that way. Pay the cops a few shillings and overnight illegal structures are put up, messing up the area.

   Day 15 breakfast is Oladushki, Russian pancakes from RUSSIA. They are slightly different from the normal pancakes we make as kefir is added to the batter. Also the pancakes are small in size, more like bite size as the name suggests. If you don't have kefir use yogurt or buttermilk instead. Oladushki is a popular Sunday brunch item in not only Russia but also in Ukraine and Belarus. These small pancakes can be served with jam, honey, sweet condensed milk, sweet yogurt or as a savory option too with sour cream and caviar or salmon. The batter can be made using wheat flour or buckwheat flour. I opted for wheat flour as I didn't have any buckwheat flour.











OLADUSHKI
Makes 24 pieces
Recipe source: Video Culinary

1 cup yogurt or kefir
1 cup flour
1 large egg
1-2 tsp sugar
¼ tsp salt
1 tsp baking soda (soda bicarbonate)
oil for cooking the pancakes
  1. Sift flour, salt and baking soda together into a big bowl. Add sugar and mix well.
  2. Mix egg, yogurt or kefir together. 
  3. Add the flour mixture to the egg mixture. 
  4. Mix till the flour is incorporated into the liquid. Don't over mix.
  5. Let the batter rest for 20-30 minutes.
  6. The batter will have become all nice and frothy.
  7. Do not stir it again.
  8. Heat oil in a shallow pan about  ½" or so over medium heat.
  9. Take a tablespoon and scoop up the batter from the side of the bowl.
  10. Drop it into the hot oil.
  11. Repeat steps 9 and 10 till you have about 4-6 pancakes sizzling in the pan. The number is obviously depend on the size of the pan.
  12. Once you see the edges have turned golden brown, flip the pancake over and let it cook.
  13. Remove from the pan onto a plate which is lined with some kitchen towel.
  14. Repeat steps 9-13 till all the batter is over.
  15. Serve hot pancakes with honey, jam, sweet condensed milk, sweet yogurt, fresh cream,cream cheese, salmon, caviar or any topping of your choice. I chose to serve it with some strawberry jam.
Tips:
  • Its the bubbles that develop that makes the pancakes really fluffy. So don't mix the batter after it has rested.
  • As soon as they come out of the pan, the pancakes deflate a little but they are so soft and delicious.
  • Don't make the mistake of pressing the pancakes down with the spatula. They will not be soft and fluffy.
  • Can be kept warm in the oven till ready to serve.

A-Z breakfast Dishes:

A - Apple Aebleskiver - Denmark
B - Baghrir - Morocco
C - Changua - Colombia
D - Dutch Baby Pancakes - Germany/USA
E - English Breakfast - England
F - French Toast - Canada
G - Griddle/Girdle Scones - Scotland
H - Hafragrautur -  Iceland
I - Idiyappam - India
J - Johnnycakes - Caribbean Islands
K - Khabees - Bahrain
L - Lahooh - Somalia
M - Masoub - Saudi Arabia
N - Nasi Goreng - Indonesia

Check out what other Mega Blogging Marathoners have made for Day 15:

   
   


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Tuesday, 17 April 2018

Nasi Goreng

MEGA BLOGGING MARATHON
#87 BLOGGING MARATHON

THEME: EXPLORE THE FLAVORS-INTERNATIONAL DISHES
DAY 14

"Breakfast like a King, Lunch like a Prince and Dine like a Pauper"

  When I decided to participate in this Mega Blogging Marathon, I knew immediately what I was going to make for the letter N. As some of you might have read my previous posts hubby and I spent last Dec in Bali. However, due to the unfortunate motorbike accident my daughter in law met with, we were not able to see as much of Bali as we would have otherwise. However, its the best bonding time we had with my son and daughter in law. 

  My son had booked a villa for us. In the evenings the receptionist would ask us what we'd like for breakfast. There wasn't much choice, it was either continental or Indonesian. On the 2nd day I decided to try the Indonesian breakfast. My son reminded me to tell them no ayam(chicken), Bebek (duck), sapi (beef), babi (pork), Ikan(fish). I was happy that I've covered the vegetarian ground pretty well. Next morning I get the famous Indonesian breakfast Nasi Goreng with shrimp!!!! Why didn't I think of that.I had to ask my daughter in law what shrimp is in Indonesian language and so that evening included no udang(shrimp) to my long list of no nos! I should have stuck with plain continental breakfast. Some how or the other some form of meat tends to creep into the platter. 

   My mission became to create a vegetarian (or lets say ova-vegetarian) version of Nasi Goreng. I was amazed how the same dish can be served for all 3 meals...breakfast, lunch and dinner. What may vary is the meat and perhaps for lunch or dinner there would be no fried egg. Sometimes the rice would be replaced with noodles to make a Mei Goreng. Basically, its a pretty healthy and easy meal and portions are not humungous. 

   It was such a pleasant site to see so many paddy fields in Bali. In the touristy area little restaurants or warungs were set up next to the paddy fields. The local rice is very aromatic and different from basmati. 

   Day 14 the breakfast is Nasi Goreng from INDONESIA. Nasi Goreng is fried rice. Fried rice served with meat, fish, vegetables, eggs, sambal oelek and prawn crackers. My version is a simpler one with no meat or fish. Two of the main ingredients for any Indonesian food is kecap manis and sambal oelek. Kecap manis is a sweet soy sauce, quite different from the normal soy sauce we know. Its readily available in Indonesia and some Asian shops. I had to make mine at home. Oelek means grinding so sambal oelek is simply ground chilis. Hot red chilis are ground with garlic, ginger, vinegar, fish sauce or shrimp paste, lime, brown sugar or palm sugar.  I used my own chili garlic sauce (without shrimp or fish). 

In my photos the fried onion is missing as I totally forgot to add it to the dish. Its only after we had the brunch did I realize that I'd forgotten the onions.

And by the way have you noticed how whenever I've made fried egg, the yolk is never in the middle even when I use a ring?? Wonder why?? This one has got to be the weirdest, with the yolk lopping on one side!



rice field


warung
NASI GORENG
Serves 2

2-3 cups of leftover rice
1 small onion, finely chopped
2-3 cloves of garlic, finely chopped
2 tbsp kecap manis*
2 fried eggs
2-3 stalks of scallion, chopped
1 tbsp deep fried onion (chop and fry)
1 tbsp oil
½ - ¾ tsp salt

To serve:
chopped vegetables like tomato, cucumber, carrot etc.
some sambal oelek**
  1. Heat oil in a wide pan over medium heat.
  2. Stir fry the onions. When they become a bit soft, add the garlic and scallions.
  3. Stir fry for a few seconds and add the kecap manis.
  4. Immediately add the rice.
  5. Mix well and let it become hot. 
  6. Add salt as required.
  7. Fry 2 eggs.
  8. To serve, spoon the rice into a plate. Put the fried egg on top. Top with fried onion. Add the vegetables and fried crackers. Serve with sambal oelek.
A-Z breakfast Dishes:

A - Apple Aebleskiver - Denmark
B - Baghrir - Morocco
C - Changua - Colombia
D - Dutch Baby Pancakes - Germany/USA
E - English Breakfast - England
F - French Toast - Canada
G - Griddle/Girdle Scones - Scotland
H - Hafragrautur -  Iceland
I - Idiyappam - India
J - Johnnycakes - Caribbean Islands
K - Khabees - Bahrain
L - Lahooh - Somalia
M - Masoub - Saudi Arabia

Tips:
  • Add chopped French beans, carrots, mushrooms etc to the fried rice if you like.
  • * to make kecap manis at home simply take 2 tbsp soy sauce and 2 tbsp brown sugar or palm sugar. Mix it in a pan. Bring the mixture to a simmer. Reduce the heat and let it become  thick. It should be like maple syrup consistency. Take the pan off the heat.
  • ** I used my own version of the chili garlic sauce. You can buy ready made sambal oelek or make it at home.
  • My rice preparation looks dark as the sugar I used was very dark. Next time I'd use palm sugar or light brown sugar.
Check out what other Mega Blogging Marathoners have made for Day 14:


   


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Monday, 16 April 2018

Masoub

MEGA BLOGGING MARATHON - APRIL 2018

#87TH BLOGGING MARATHON

THEME: EXPLORE THE FLAVORS - INTERNATIONAL BREAKFAST
DAY 13

"Breakfast like a King, Lunch like a Prince and Dine like a Pauper"

   Wow, we've reached half way, another half to go. As the letters are passing by so quickly so are the days.  I had the real Monday Blues today. Got up early, beat the clock and finished all my kitchen work before the water went away and was all ready to tackle a few hours on the computer. However, suddenly I felt a little dizzy and couldn't concentrate on what I was supposed to write. Decided to rest a bit till hubby comes home for lunch. Served lunch, didn't feel like eating much but he coaxed me to have a bit. After that suddenly a throbbing headache, can't bear to look at daylight and eventually threw up. The cause: Migraine. 

   Hubby thinks that I had it because its around this time that I'm suppose to get my periods but have been in the menopause stage for over a year. He reckons that the body still goes through those hormonal changes monthly without getting the periods. He gave some medicine, I switched on the AC in the room and fell asleep till evening! 

   Basically, what I'm trying to get at is that as women we have to go through so much. Remember the time when you're 11-12 and you no longer fit in the cute girl category and neither in the young woman one.. all gawky and not too sure of what changes are taking place in the body. Then you reach the time when you begin your menstrual cycles (and what a taboo it was back then to discuss or talk about it openly). Again you're in such a horrible awkward situation as you don't want the men of the family to know or even the boys in the class to know what horrible changes are taking place.

   Then comes the time when you are about to give birth and have given birth. Don't misunderstand me I thoroughly loved my adorable little bundles of joy but what it was doing to my body was not funny at all. At that time exercise was not given much importance, you couldn't refuse the ghee laden food that was fed to you in the name of producing enough milk for the kids. Then begins the battle of the bulge, again hormonal changes whenever you have your periods...deal with your extra sensitive emotions during this time and kids tantrums. Wow what a combination.

   The kids are all grown up and now you have to go through the painful for some stage of menopause. Again lots of changes occurring in the body. Finally the periods disappear and the symptoms remain... feeling nausea, migraine, bloating, stomach enlarging and what not. Some of these things that I didn't go through when I was having my regular cycles are all coming to me now... including acne! Imagine a 50+ woman having to deal with zits!

   After a bit of pampering and loving care by hubby, am up now and blogging. I did get strange looks from hubby -trying to tell me that I'm suppose to rest. 

   My breakfast dish for M is Masoub from SAUDI ARABIA. When I came across this recipe, I cancelled  mekitsi and melkkos and opted for this super easy and awesomely delicious breakfast treat. Why easy? Well its a great way to use up leftover plain parathas, rotis or brown bread. I used up parathas. And you need ripe banana and hey presto breakfast is ready. If you're like me who loves roti with banana (I add a bit of sugar and ghee) then this breakfast is for you. It also tastes like a quick bread pudding.






MASOUB
Serves 1
Recipe source: cultureatz.com

1 paratha or 2 rotis or 2 slices of brown bread
1 banana
1 tbsp sliced almonds
6-8 raisins
1 tbsp whipped cream
1 tsp honey
  1. Grind the paratha, roti or bread into a coarse crumb mixture.
  2. Mash banana and add the paratha crumb.
  3. Mix well.
  4. Spoon the mixture into a serving bowl.
  5. Top with some whipped cream.
  6. Add sliced almonds and raisins.
  7. Finally drizzle a bit of honey and serve.
Tips:
  • Use nuts and dried fruits of your choice.
  • Serving with whipped cream is optional, but it really makes it taste so good.
  • Best way to use up leftover paratha, roti or wheat bread.
  • The original recipe suggests even serving some cheddar cheese with it but I skipped it.
A-Z breakfast Dishes:

A - Apple Aebleskiver - Denmark
B - Baghrir - Morocco
C - Changua - Colombia
D - Dutch Baby Pancakes - Germany/USA
E - English Breakfast - England
F - French Toast - Canada
G - Griddle/Girdle Scones - Scotland
H - Hafragrautur -  Iceland
I - Idiyappam - India
J - Johnnycakes - Caribbean Islands
K - Khabees - Bahrain
L - Lahooh - Somalia


Check out what other Mega Blogging Marathoners have made for Day 13:
 

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Coffee and Coconut Fat Bomb

A fad or essential?

   I know a number of people who follow the ketogenic diet or the keto diet. They've been requesting me add some keto friendly recipes to my collection. I've resisted so far as I just cannot get use to the idea that eating fat is good. Here for years its been drummed into our heads that fat is bad so we all have been trying to cook with minimum amount of oil, eat dry toast without butter, air fry snacks, bake instead of fry and what not.

   For those on a keto diet sugar is absolutely out including the natural ones like honey and maple syrup. Carbohydrate consumption at a bare minimum, fill your tummy with protein and fat. Once the body is starved, instead of burning carbs which it doesn't get it begins to burn fat.

   Little protein balls that everyone swore by to beat the hunger pangs are fast being replaced by the fat bombs. Seriously, all the keto friendly food names are something to ponder about, fat bombs, cloud bread, bullet coffee, potato salad with no potato, rice with no actual rice..yes just a few that I'm hearing about.

   What are fat bombs? In a keto diet most fruits are out. One can have fresh berries but in limitation. Seeds and nuts are allowed but again in limited amount. Fat bombs are made using fat which is usually butters, coconut oil, seeds, nuts etc. One small bomb is suppose to ward off hunger pangs and keep your diet on track. Fat is used to fill your tummy. However, that does not mean you can eat a whole tubful of butter or consume a whole packet of cream. Its important to count the calories or macros as they are called. So if you think popping 2-3 fat bombs and plus all your normal food is good, it isn't. These fat bombs are mainly for people who follow a very strict keto diet.

   Not endorsing any diet, please make your own choice as to what is good or bad for you.

   When Sujata who blogs at Batter Up with Sujata (check out all her healthy recipes) suggested that #140th theme as #coffee for the FoodieMonday/ Bloghop group, I was planning to make a sinful dessert. However, I got busy over the weekend with guests and couldn't make the dessert. Then I remembered the constant request for a keto friendly recipe. So here's a coffee and coconut fat bomb recipe.

   After it was set, I tried one and didn't enjoy it. I missed the sweetness in it.  However, fat bombs are recommended as a snack for those on a keto diet. 






COFFEE AND COCONUT FAT BOMB 
Makes 16 small balls
Per Serving: Fat 15% Protein 4% Carbohydrates 1%

1 cup walnuts (or any nuts of your choice)
¼ cup desiccated coconut (unsweetened)
2 tbsp soft butter
1 tbsp chia seeds
1 tbsp flax seeds
1 tbsp cocao nibs
1 tbsp coffee powder
½ tsp cinnamon powder
a generous pinch of sea salt
1 tsp stevia powder or any sweetener of your choice


  1. Add the nuts into a food processor. Pulse for a few seconds so that the nuts get chopped into smaller pieces.
  2. Add desiccated coconut, flax seeds, coffee powder, salt, cinnamon powder, stevia, butter to the chopped nuts.
  3. Process till you get a paste.
  4. Add cocao nibs and chia seeds. Mix well.
  5. Take a teaspoonful of the mixture and roll it into a ball or press it into a mold.
  6. Sprinkle a bit of coffee powder over it.
  7. Put it in the fridge for 1-2 hours till the fat bombs become solid.
  8. Store in an airtight container in the fridge. 
Tips:
  • I used walnuts but you can use any nuts of your choice.
  • Add seeds of your choice.
  • I've read in tips on Keto diet that fat bombs are added to black coffee.
You may want to check out other coffee recipes (not keto friendly):
homemade cold coffee
eggless brownies
pumpkin spice latte
Sending this recipe to the following event:


Saturday, 14 April 2018

Lahooh/Lahoh

MEGA BLOGGING MARATHON - APRIL 2018

#87 BLOGGING MARATHON

THEME: EXPLORE THE FLAVORS - INTERNATIONAL BREAKFAST
DAY 12

"Breakfast like a King, Lunch like a Prince and Dine like a Pauper"

   Today is one of those days when I don't have much to write about. Finally its begun to rain. Just as well as last night was just too humid. The AC was on at its lowest and I was still feeling hot. Today has been a cool day...remember I've mentioned in my previous posts, Mombasa is never too cold that you may need to wear a sweater or a cardigan. Due to the fact that I hardly get a chance to wear them, I probably own 2 that may be ancient.

   Day 12 my breakfast dish is Lahooh (laxoox) from my neighboring country SOMALIA. With the influx of refugees over the years from Somalia we have quite a large Somali community in Mombasa. However, its a pity that cuisine from Somalia is not readily available in restaurants around Mombasa. Finding a breakfast dish beginning with L proved to be quite a task. Except for mention of Laban (yogurt in the Middle East countries) as a part of breakfast, there was no other mention of breakfast dish beginning with L.  How did I get to lahooh? I was searching for breakfast dishes from neighboring countries and stumbled up Lahooh.

   This has been a wonderful find for me. Looks like crepes or dosa. Its a Somali flatbread, spongy and soft which popular as breakfast with eggs, suqaar(cubed meat), just sugar and butter or with olive oil and honey. Lahooh can be made using a quick method, with yeast or even a sourdough starter. Lahooh is also eaten during lunch and dinner time.

   This recipe gave me the opportunity to revive my Princess. Princess??? Yes that's my sourdough starter. I hate throwing away the discard and use it to add a bit to parathas, chilas, focaccia or anything that needs fermentation etc. Before I went to India in November I just stored the starter in the freezer. When I decided I wanted to use the starter, took it out of the freezer and allowed it to thaw at room temperature. Then I took about half a cup and fed it till it was nice and bubbly. The rest is sitting in the fridge in a dormant state.

   Instead of suqaar, I decided to serve lahooh with some aubergines and eggs. Its become my hubby's favorite and wants me to make it soon again. We also enjoyed lahooh with some honey and butter next day and they were delicious.









LAHOOH/LAHOH  
Makes 8-10
Recipe Source: My Somali Food

For Lahooh:
½ cup millet flour
½ cup fine cornmeal flour
½ cup plain flour
½ cup wheat flour
1 cup active sourdough starter
½ tsp salt
2½ - 3 cups water
1 tsp soda bicarbonate (baking soda)

some oil


For the aubergine filling:

1 large aubergine, cut into cubes (approx. 2 cups)
1 onion cut into cubes
2 large tomatoes, cut into cubes
3-4 cloves of garlic, chopped
1 tbsp olive oil
1-1¼ tsp salt
1 tsp paprika
1 tsp coriander powder
½ tsp pepper powder
2-3 tbsp chopped fresh coriander
2-3 tbsp chopped spring onion

4 fried eggs


Preparation of Lahooh:

  1. Mix the flours with salt and baking soda.
  2. Mix water and sourdough starter.
  3. Add it to the flour mixture and mix to a smooth batter.
  4. Cover and let the batter ferment for 30 minutes to overnight. I allowed the batter to ferment for 4 hours.
  5. Heat a large frying pan or tawa on medium heat.
  6. Rub it with very little oil.
  7. Take about a ¼ cup batter and spread it on the frying pan in a circular motion. 
  8. Drizzle some oil around the lahooh.
  9. Lat it cook till the edges come off the pan by itself. Cook only one side.
Preparation of the filling:(serves 4)
  1. Heat oil in a pan over medium heat.
  2. When its hot add onion and garlic.
  3. Stir fry till the onions become soft.
  4. Add the cubed aubergine and tomatoes.
  5. Add paprika, coriander powders and salt.
  6. Cover and cook till the aubergines are just done.
  7. Add pepper and mix.
Make fried eggs.

To serve:
  1. Take one lahooh.
  2. Put some aubergine in the middle.
  3. Make a well in the middle.
  4. Add a fried egg.
  5. Sprinkle some fresh coriander and spring onion.
  6. Serve with some tea or coffee.
Tips:
  • Instead of aubergine use cubed meat, mushrooms or lentils.
  • Next time I'd probably serve the eggs and aubergine stew on the side as the lahooh becomes soggy in the middle.
  • Serve lahooh with sugar and butter or olive oil and honey.
A-Z breakfast Dishes:

A - Apple Aebleskiver - Denmark
B - Baghrir - Morocco
C - Changua - Colombia
D - Dutch Baby Pancakes - Germany/USA
E - English Breakfast - England
F - French Toast - Canada
G - Griddle/Girdle Scones - Scotland
H - Hafragrautur -  Iceland
I - Idiyappam - India
J - Johnnycakes - Caribbean Islands
K - Khabees - Bahrain

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Friday, 20 April 2018

Pandesal

MEGA BLOGGING MARATHON - APRIL 2018
#87 BLOGGING MARATHON

THEME: EXPLORE THE FLAVORS  - INTERNATIONAL BREAKFAST
DAY 16

"Breakfast like a King, Lunch like a Prince and Dine like a Pauper"

   As we're fast approaching towards the end, a few of my recipes are not ready and am fighting for time to make them. I had an idea what I wanted to make but some got left undone as I went away on a family holiday. Now with daily routine, water issues, inviting guests over for dinners and tomorrow have to make idli sambhar for my Lions Club dinner (nearly 20 people), I'm yet to make my breakfast dish with Q.  The only way I can see myself making that tomorrow in between steaming idlis and simmering sambhar is perhaps serve it to hubby for lunch. He somehow enjoys his porridge with fresh fruits and nuts from Monday to Saturday and Sunday has to be a cereal day. He can eat the same food every single day. Me on the other hand, I want variety. 

   Anyway, lets get talking about today's breakfast and worry about Q tomorrow. Today is it P for Pandesal from the PHILIPPINES. Pandesal literally means bread of salt. These rolls are typically served with coffee and accompanied with butter, cheese, jam or peanut butter. These rolls are a Spanish version of the French baguette. The Philippines was once a Spanish colony.

   Though the name is pandesal, bread of salt, it actually tastes sweeter. The rolls are soft and because they are coated with bread crumbs before baking, the crust is crispy when warm. Next day the rolls tend to become soft but when toasted taste heavenly.  These rolls reminded me of the pav rolls. Soft and buttery. 

  Since I started preparing the breakfast dishes butter and jam consumption has gone up. So for these rolls the jam had to stay in the fridge. Instead we enjoyed these rolls with some cheese. Next day hubby enjoyed the rolls with soup and I dunked mine in proper milky coffee. 






PANDESAL
Makes 12

3 cups plain flour(all purpose flour)
¾ cup warm milk
2 tsp dry active yeast 
1¼ tsp salt
¼ cup sugar
3 tbsp butter, at room temperature
1 egg, lightly beaten
½ cup bread crumbs

extra flour for dusting
extra butter for greasing

  1. If you're not using instant active dry yeast then you need to let it ferment for a while. Take some warm milk, add about 1 tsp sugar from the measured sugar. Mix well. Sprinkle the yeast over it. Cover and let it sit for 10 minutes till the mixture is frothy.
  2. Mix salt and sugar into the flour.
  3. Add the yeast mixture, the remaining milk, egg and butter.
  4. Mix the dough with a spatula or wooden spoon. Let it rest for 10-15 minutes.
  5. Sprinkle little flour on the worktop.
  6. Tip the dough onto the worktop and knead till you get a smooth and silky dough. The dough may be sticky but don't be tempted to add too much flour. Instead grease your hand with some butter.
  7. Shape the dough into a ball and return it to a greased bowl.
  8. Cover with a damp tea towel or cling film and let it rise till its double in size. Mine took  about 1 hour.
  9. Dust the worktop lightly with flour. Take the dough out of the bowl onto the worktop.
  10. Deflate it gently and divide it into 2.
  11. Roll each dough part into a log about 6" long. Roll both the logs in breadcrumbs.
  12. Slice the logs diagonally, about 1" thick. 
  13. Roll each piece again in breadcrumb and place it on a lined baking tray.
  14. At this point you can place the pandesal close to each other to make pull apart rolls or place them about an inch apart to make individual rolls.
  15. Let the rolls rise till they are double in size, about 45-50 minutes.
  16. Preheat the oven to 180°C.
  17. Bake the pandesal for 15 minutes or till the tops are golden brown.
  18. Remove the rolls from the oven. Let them cool down a bit on a wire rack.
  19. Serve warm pandesal with coffee, butter, jam, peanut butter or cheese. 
Tips:
  • Place the shaped rolls apart for individual rolls or close together to make a pull apart bread.
  • As you don't want chewy buns its best to use plain flour and not bread flour.
  • Don't be tempted to add more flour as the rolls may turn out dense.

A-Z breakfast Dishes:

A - Apple Aebleskiver - Denmark
B - Baghrir - Morocco
C - Changua - Colombia
D - Dutch Baby Pancakes - Germany/USA
E - English Breakfast - England
F - French Toast - Canada
G - Griddle/Girdle Scones - Scotland
H - Hafragrautur -  Iceland
I - Idiyappam - India
J - Johnnycakes - Caribbean Islands
K - Khabees - Bahrain
L - Lahooh - Somalia
M - Masoub - Saudi Arabia
N - Nasi Goreng - Indonesia
O - Oladushki - Russia

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Wednesday, 18 April 2018

Oladushki - Russian Pancakes

MEGA BLOGGING MARATHON - APRIL 2018
#87 BLOGGING MARATHON

THEME: EXPLORE THE FLAVORS  - INTERNATIONAL BREAKFAST
DAY 15

"Breakfast like a King, Lunch like a Prince and Dine like a Pauper"

   Today hubby took me out for lunch to a Chinese Restaurant which is at what all Kenyans know as Lighthouse. Its like recreational place by the sea. Looking over from the cliff, you can see the blue sea, watch ships passing by, enjoy roasted cassava, roasted sweet potatoes, roasted corn, fried cassava, cassava chips, coconut water, ice creams and lately boiled eggs, sodas, potato chips have been added. This is one place that no body leaves Mombasa without visiting. As you enter the famous Mama Ngina Drive as the road is called, from the ferry side, you'll be greeted by really big, fat trunked baobab trees. If you enter at the other end, you'll pass State House, the official Mombasa residence of the President and come to the famous Mombasa Golf Club, founded in 1911. Lighthouse has many fond memories for me. Its where we'd come with my cousins whenever we visited Mombasa. We'd walk all the way from their home, run around, enjoy cassava chips served in cone shaped newspaper and then walk back when it became dark. Pretty safe to walk back then. After my marriage, that's where hubby would take me when I had a serious craving for Choco Ice a vanilla chocolate ice cream sold by Lyons, brought to Lighthouse everyday in the afternoon by ice cream vendors pushing little white carts. Its where we've brought our kids when they were young, its where hubby and I have sat in the evenings to enjoy the cool breeze when we've had power cuts for long hours as our previous apartment would become like an oven. Its where my father in law and mother in law would meet up with friends every evening. Basically Lighthouse use to be full of life and you'd definitely meet someone you know.

   Nowadays the story is completely different. Its become so filthy, temporary structures with plastic, wood and stones are put up everywhere. Food is sold there and the surrounding is strewn with plastic bottles, papers, broken plastic chairs, stones, basically making the place very uninviting. Once I saw a tourist bus there and felt, that they were brought here so that they could see how as citizens of a beautiful country, we just don't know how to keep it clean and beautiful. I seen a few of the old baobab trees chopped down, matatu drivers, touts, and the youth idling around there have become a menace, banging on cars and windows. Tuktuks and matatus stop in the middle of the road. Just so much filth everywhere and no law and order. Its such a shame. Charity Clubs like Lions Clubs, Rotary, Round Table over the years have put in so much effort and money to make Lighthouse a place of relaxation for all but unfortunately Mombasa County has not taken it up on them to keep it that way. Pay the cops a few shillings and overnight illegal structures are put up, messing up the area.

   Day 15 breakfast is Oladushki, Russian pancakes from RUSSIA. They are slightly different from the normal pancakes we make as kefir is added to the batter. Also the pancakes are small in size, more like bite size as the name suggests. If you don't have kefir use yogurt or buttermilk instead. Oladushki is a popular Sunday brunch item in not only Russia but also in Ukraine and Belarus. These small pancakes can be served with jam, honey, sweet condensed milk, sweet yogurt or as a savory option too with sour cream and caviar or salmon. The batter can be made using wheat flour or buckwheat flour. I opted for wheat flour as I didn't have any buckwheat flour.











OLADUSHKI
Makes 24 pieces
Recipe source: Video Culinary

1 cup yogurt or kefir
1 cup flour
1 large egg
1-2 tsp sugar
¼ tsp salt
1 tsp baking soda (soda bicarbonate)
oil for cooking the pancakes
  1. Sift flour, salt and baking soda together into a big bowl. Add sugar and mix well.
  2. Mix egg, yogurt or kefir together. 
  3. Add the flour mixture to the egg mixture. 
  4. Mix till the flour is incorporated into the liquid. Don't over mix.
  5. Let the batter rest for 20-30 minutes.
  6. The batter will have become all nice and frothy.
  7. Do not stir it again.
  8. Heat oil in a shallow pan about  ½" or so over medium heat.
  9. Take a tablespoon and scoop up the batter from the side of the bowl.
  10. Drop it into the hot oil.
  11. Repeat steps 9 and 10 till you have about 4-6 pancakes sizzling in the pan. The number is obviously depend on the size of the pan.
  12. Once you see the edges have turned golden brown, flip the pancake over and let it cook.
  13. Remove from the pan onto a plate which is lined with some kitchen towel.
  14. Repeat steps 9-13 till all the batter is over.
  15. Serve hot pancakes with honey, jam, sweet condensed milk, sweet yogurt, fresh cream,cream cheese, salmon, caviar or any topping of your choice. I chose to serve it with some strawberry jam.
Tips:
  • Its the bubbles that develop that makes the pancakes really fluffy. So don't mix the batter after it has rested.
  • As soon as they come out of the pan, the pancakes deflate a little but they are so soft and delicious.
  • Don't make the mistake of pressing the pancakes down with the spatula. They will not be soft and fluffy.
  • Can be kept warm in the oven till ready to serve.

A-Z breakfast Dishes:

A - Apple Aebleskiver - Denmark
B - Baghrir - Morocco
C - Changua - Colombia
D - Dutch Baby Pancakes - Germany/USA
E - English Breakfast - England
F - French Toast - Canada
G - Griddle/Girdle Scones - Scotland
H - Hafragrautur -  Iceland
I - Idiyappam - India
J - Johnnycakes - Caribbean Islands
K - Khabees - Bahrain
L - Lahooh - Somalia
M - Masoub - Saudi Arabia
N - Nasi Goreng - Indonesia

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Tuesday, 17 April 2018

Nasi Goreng

MEGA BLOGGING MARATHON
#87 BLOGGING MARATHON

THEME: EXPLORE THE FLAVORS-INTERNATIONAL DISHES
DAY 14

"Breakfast like a King, Lunch like a Prince and Dine like a Pauper"

  When I decided to participate in this Mega Blogging Marathon, I knew immediately what I was going to make for the letter N. As some of you might have read my previous posts hubby and I spent last Dec in Bali. However, due to the unfortunate motorbike accident my daughter in law met with, we were not able to see as much of Bali as we would have otherwise. However, its the best bonding time we had with my son and daughter in law. 

  My son had booked a villa for us. In the evenings the receptionist would ask us what we'd like for breakfast. There wasn't much choice, it was either continental or Indonesian. On the 2nd day I decided to try the Indonesian breakfast. My son reminded me to tell them no ayam(chicken), Bebek (duck), sapi (beef), babi (pork), Ikan(fish). I was happy that I've covered the vegetarian ground pretty well. Next morning I get the famous Indonesian breakfast Nasi Goreng with shrimp!!!! Why didn't I think of that.I had to ask my daughter in law what shrimp is in Indonesian language and so that evening included no udang(shrimp) to my long list of no nos! I should have stuck with plain continental breakfast. Some how or the other some form of meat tends to creep into the platter. 

   My mission became to create a vegetarian (or lets say ova-vegetarian) version of Nasi Goreng. I was amazed how the same dish can be served for all 3 meals...breakfast, lunch and dinner. What may vary is the meat and perhaps for lunch or dinner there would be no fried egg. Sometimes the rice would be replaced with noodles to make a Mei Goreng. Basically, its a pretty healthy and easy meal and portions are not humungous. 

   It was such a pleasant site to see so many paddy fields in Bali. In the touristy area little restaurants or warungs were set up next to the paddy fields. The local rice is very aromatic and different from basmati. 

   Day 14 the breakfast is Nasi Goreng from INDONESIA. Nasi Goreng is fried rice. Fried rice served with meat, fish, vegetables, eggs, sambal oelek and prawn crackers. My version is a simpler one with no meat or fish. Two of the main ingredients for any Indonesian food is kecap manis and sambal oelek. Kecap manis is a sweet soy sauce, quite different from the normal soy sauce we know. Its readily available in Indonesia and some Asian shops. I had to make mine at home. Oelek means grinding so sambal oelek is simply ground chilis. Hot red chilis are ground with garlic, ginger, vinegar, fish sauce or shrimp paste, lime, brown sugar or palm sugar.  I used my own chili garlic sauce (without shrimp or fish). 

In my photos the fried onion is missing as I totally forgot to add it to the dish. Its only after we had the brunch did I realize that I'd forgotten the onions.

And by the way have you noticed how whenever I've made fried egg, the yolk is never in the middle even when I use a ring?? Wonder why?? This one has got to be the weirdest, with the yolk lopping on one side!



rice field


warung
NASI GORENG
Serves 2

2-3 cups of leftover rice
1 small onion, finely chopped
2-3 cloves of garlic, finely chopped
2 tbsp kecap manis*
2 fried eggs
2-3 stalks of scallion, chopped
1 tbsp deep fried onion (chop and fry)
1 tbsp oil
½ - ¾ tsp salt

To serve:
chopped vegetables like tomato, cucumber, carrot etc.
some sambal oelek**
  1. Heat oil in a wide pan over medium heat.
  2. Stir fry the onions. When they become a bit soft, add the garlic and scallions.
  3. Stir fry for a few seconds and add the kecap manis.
  4. Immediately add the rice.
  5. Mix well and let it become hot. 
  6. Add salt as required.
  7. Fry 2 eggs.
  8. To serve, spoon the rice into a plate. Put the fried egg on top. Top with fried onion. Add the vegetables and fried crackers. Serve with sambal oelek.
A-Z breakfast Dishes:

A - Apple Aebleskiver - Denmark
B - Baghrir - Morocco
C - Changua - Colombia
D - Dutch Baby Pancakes - Germany/USA
E - English Breakfast - England
F - French Toast - Canada
G - Griddle/Girdle Scones - Scotland
H - Hafragrautur -  Iceland
I - Idiyappam - India
J - Johnnycakes - Caribbean Islands
K - Khabees - Bahrain
L - Lahooh - Somalia
M - Masoub - Saudi Arabia

Tips:
  • Add chopped French beans, carrots, mushrooms etc to the fried rice if you like.
  • * to make kecap manis at home simply take 2 tbsp soy sauce and 2 tbsp brown sugar or palm sugar. Mix it in a pan. Bring the mixture to a simmer. Reduce the heat and let it become  thick. It should be like maple syrup consistency. Take the pan off the heat.
  • ** I used my own version of the chili garlic sauce. You can buy ready made sambal oelek or make it at home.
  • My rice preparation looks dark as the sugar I used was very dark. Next time I'd use palm sugar or light brown sugar.
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Monday, 16 April 2018

Masoub

MEGA BLOGGING MARATHON - APRIL 2018

#87TH BLOGGING MARATHON

THEME: EXPLORE THE FLAVORS - INTERNATIONAL BREAKFAST
DAY 13

"Breakfast like a King, Lunch like a Prince and Dine like a Pauper"

   Wow, we've reached half way, another half to go. As the letters are passing by so quickly so are the days.  I had the real Monday Blues today. Got up early, beat the clock and finished all my kitchen work before the water went away and was all ready to tackle a few hours on the computer. However, suddenly I felt a little dizzy and couldn't concentrate on what I was supposed to write. Decided to rest a bit till hubby comes home for lunch. Served lunch, didn't feel like eating much but he coaxed me to have a bit. After that suddenly a throbbing headache, can't bear to look at daylight and eventually threw up. The cause: Migraine. 

   Hubby thinks that I had it because its around this time that I'm suppose to get my periods but have been in the menopause stage for over a year. He reckons that the body still goes through those hormonal changes monthly without getting the periods. He gave some medicine, I switched on the AC in the room and fell asleep till evening! 

   Basically, what I'm trying to get at is that as women we have to go through so much. Remember the time when you're 11-12 and you no longer fit in the cute girl category and neither in the young woman one.. all gawky and not too sure of what changes are taking place in the body. Then you reach the time when you begin your menstrual cycles (and what a taboo it was back then to discuss or talk about it openly). Again you're in such a horrible awkward situation as you don't want the men of the family to know or even the boys in the class to know what horrible changes are taking place.

   Then comes the time when you are about to give birth and have given birth. Don't misunderstand me I thoroughly loved my adorable little bundles of joy but what it was doing to my body was not funny at all. At that time exercise was not given much importance, you couldn't refuse the ghee laden food that was fed to you in the name of producing enough milk for the kids. Then begins the battle of the bulge, again hormonal changes whenever you have your periods...deal with your extra sensitive emotions during this time and kids tantrums. Wow what a combination.

   The kids are all grown up and now you have to go through the painful for some stage of menopause. Again lots of changes occurring in the body. Finally the periods disappear and the symptoms remain... feeling nausea, migraine, bloating, stomach enlarging and what not. Some of these things that I didn't go through when I was having my regular cycles are all coming to me now... including acne! Imagine a 50+ woman having to deal with zits!

   After a bit of pampering and loving care by hubby, am up now and blogging. I did get strange looks from hubby -trying to tell me that I'm suppose to rest. 

   My breakfast dish for M is Masoub from SAUDI ARABIA. When I came across this recipe, I cancelled  mekitsi and melkkos and opted for this super easy and awesomely delicious breakfast treat. Why easy? Well its a great way to use up leftover plain parathas, rotis or brown bread. I used up parathas. And you need ripe banana and hey presto breakfast is ready. If you're like me who loves roti with banana (I add a bit of sugar and ghee) then this breakfast is for you. It also tastes like a quick bread pudding.






MASOUB
Serves 1
Recipe source: cultureatz.com

1 paratha or 2 rotis or 2 slices of brown bread
1 banana
1 tbsp sliced almonds
6-8 raisins
1 tbsp whipped cream
1 tsp honey
  1. Grind the paratha, roti or bread into a coarse crumb mixture.
  2. Mash banana and add the paratha crumb.
  3. Mix well.
  4. Spoon the mixture into a serving bowl.
  5. Top with some whipped cream.
  6. Add sliced almonds and raisins.
  7. Finally drizzle a bit of honey and serve.
Tips:
  • Use nuts and dried fruits of your choice.
  • Serving with whipped cream is optional, but it really makes it taste so good.
  • Best way to use up leftover paratha, roti or wheat bread.
  • The original recipe suggests even serving some cheddar cheese with it but I skipped it.
A-Z breakfast Dishes:

A - Apple Aebleskiver - Denmark
B - Baghrir - Morocco
C - Changua - Colombia
D - Dutch Baby Pancakes - Germany/USA
E - English Breakfast - England
F - French Toast - Canada
G - Griddle/Girdle Scones - Scotland
H - Hafragrautur -  Iceland
I - Idiyappam - India
J - Johnnycakes - Caribbean Islands
K - Khabees - Bahrain
L - Lahooh - Somalia


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Coffee and Coconut Fat Bomb

A fad or essential?

   I know a number of people who follow the ketogenic diet or the keto diet. They've been requesting me add some keto friendly recipes to my collection. I've resisted so far as I just cannot get use to the idea that eating fat is good. Here for years its been drummed into our heads that fat is bad so we all have been trying to cook with minimum amount of oil, eat dry toast without butter, air fry snacks, bake instead of fry and what not.

   For those on a keto diet sugar is absolutely out including the natural ones like honey and maple syrup. Carbohydrate consumption at a bare minimum, fill your tummy with protein and fat. Once the body is starved, instead of burning carbs which it doesn't get it begins to burn fat.

   Little protein balls that everyone swore by to beat the hunger pangs are fast being replaced by the fat bombs. Seriously, all the keto friendly food names are something to ponder about, fat bombs, cloud bread, bullet coffee, potato salad with no potato, rice with no actual rice..yes just a few that I'm hearing about.

   What are fat bombs? In a keto diet most fruits are out. One can have fresh berries but in limitation. Seeds and nuts are allowed but again in limited amount. Fat bombs are made using fat which is usually butters, coconut oil, seeds, nuts etc. One small bomb is suppose to ward off hunger pangs and keep your diet on track. Fat is used to fill your tummy. However, that does not mean you can eat a whole tubful of butter or consume a whole packet of cream. Its important to count the calories or macros as they are called. So if you think popping 2-3 fat bombs and plus all your normal food is good, it isn't. These fat bombs are mainly for people who follow a very strict keto diet.

   Not endorsing any diet, please make your own choice as to what is good or bad for you.

   When Sujata who blogs at Batter Up with Sujata (check out all her healthy recipes) suggested that #140th theme as #coffee for the FoodieMonday/ Bloghop group, I was planning to make a sinful dessert. However, I got busy over the weekend with guests and couldn't make the dessert. Then I remembered the constant request for a keto friendly recipe. So here's a coffee and coconut fat bomb recipe.

   After it was set, I tried one and didn't enjoy it. I missed the sweetness in it.  However, fat bombs are recommended as a snack for those on a keto diet. 






COFFEE AND COCONUT FAT BOMB 
Makes 16 small balls
Per Serving: Fat 15% Protein 4% Carbohydrates 1%

1 cup walnuts (or any nuts of your choice)
¼ cup desiccated coconut (unsweetened)
2 tbsp soft butter
1 tbsp chia seeds
1 tbsp flax seeds
1 tbsp cocao nibs
1 tbsp coffee powder
½ tsp cinnamon powder
a generous pinch of sea salt
1 tsp stevia powder or any sweetener of your choice


  1. Add the nuts into a food processor. Pulse for a few seconds so that the nuts get chopped into smaller pieces.
  2. Add desiccated coconut, flax seeds, coffee powder, salt, cinnamon powder, stevia, butter to the chopped nuts.
  3. Process till you get a paste.
  4. Add cocao nibs and chia seeds. Mix well.
  5. Take a teaspoonful of the mixture and roll it into a ball or press it into a mold.
  6. Sprinkle a bit of coffee powder over it.
  7. Put it in the fridge for 1-2 hours till the fat bombs become solid.
  8. Store in an airtight container in the fridge. 
Tips:
  • I used walnuts but you can use any nuts of your choice.
  • Add seeds of your choice.
  • I've read in tips on Keto diet that fat bombs are added to black coffee.
You may want to check out other coffee recipes (not keto friendly):
homemade cold coffee
eggless brownies
pumpkin spice latte
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Saturday, 14 April 2018

Lahooh/Lahoh

MEGA BLOGGING MARATHON - APRIL 2018

#87 BLOGGING MARATHON

THEME: EXPLORE THE FLAVORS - INTERNATIONAL BREAKFAST
DAY 12

"Breakfast like a King, Lunch like a Prince and Dine like a Pauper"

   Today is one of those days when I don't have much to write about. Finally its begun to rain. Just as well as last night was just too humid. The AC was on at its lowest and I was still feeling hot. Today has been a cool day...remember I've mentioned in my previous posts, Mombasa is never too cold that you may need to wear a sweater or a cardigan. Due to the fact that I hardly get a chance to wear them, I probably own 2 that may be ancient.

   Day 12 my breakfast dish is Lahooh (laxoox) from my neighboring country SOMALIA. With the influx of refugees over the years from Somalia we have quite a large Somali community in Mombasa. However, its a pity that cuisine from Somalia is not readily available in restaurants around Mombasa. Finding a breakfast dish beginning with L proved to be quite a task. Except for mention of Laban (yogurt in the Middle East countries) as a part of breakfast, there was no other mention of breakfast dish beginning with L.  How did I get to lahooh? I was searching for breakfast dishes from neighboring countries and stumbled up Lahooh.

   This has been a wonderful find for me. Looks like crepes or dosa. Its a Somali flatbread, spongy and soft which popular as breakfast with eggs, suqaar(cubed meat), just sugar and butter or with olive oil and honey. Lahooh can be made using a quick method, with yeast or even a sourdough starter. Lahooh is also eaten during lunch and dinner time.

   This recipe gave me the opportunity to revive my Princess. Princess??? Yes that's my sourdough starter. I hate throwing away the discard and use it to add a bit to parathas, chilas, focaccia or anything that needs fermentation etc. Before I went to India in November I just stored the starter in the freezer. When I decided I wanted to use the starter, took it out of the freezer and allowed it to thaw at room temperature. Then I took about half a cup and fed it till it was nice and bubbly. The rest is sitting in the fridge in a dormant state.

   Instead of suqaar, I decided to serve lahooh with some aubergines and eggs. Its become my hubby's favorite and wants me to make it soon again. We also enjoyed lahooh with some honey and butter next day and they were delicious.









LAHOOH/LAHOH  
Makes 8-10
Recipe Source: My Somali Food

For Lahooh:
½ cup millet flour
½ cup fine cornmeal flour
½ cup plain flour
½ cup wheat flour
1 cup active sourdough starter
½ tsp salt
2½ - 3 cups water
1 tsp soda bicarbonate (baking soda)

some oil


For the aubergine filling:

1 large aubergine, cut into cubes (approx. 2 cups)
1 onion cut into cubes
2 large tomatoes, cut into cubes
3-4 cloves of garlic, chopped
1 tbsp olive oil
1-1¼ tsp salt
1 tsp paprika
1 tsp coriander powder
½ tsp pepper powder
2-3 tbsp chopped fresh coriander
2-3 tbsp chopped spring onion

4 fried eggs


Preparation of Lahooh:

  1. Mix the flours with salt and baking soda.
  2. Mix water and sourdough starter.
  3. Add it to the flour mixture and mix to a smooth batter.
  4. Cover and let the batter ferment for 30 minutes to overnight. I allowed the batter to ferment for 4 hours.
  5. Heat a large frying pan or tawa on medium heat.
  6. Rub it with very little oil.
  7. Take about a ¼ cup batter and spread it on the frying pan in a circular motion. 
  8. Drizzle some oil around the lahooh.
  9. Lat it cook till the edges come off the pan by itself. Cook only one side.
Preparation of the filling:(serves 4)
  1. Heat oil in a pan over medium heat.
  2. When its hot add onion and garlic.
  3. Stir fry till the onions become soft.
  4. Add the cubed aubergine and tomatoes.
  5. Add paprika, coriander powders and salt.
  6. Cover and cook till the aubergines are just done.
  7. Add pepper and mix.
Make fried eggs.

To serve:
  1. Take one lahooh.
  2. Put some aubergine in the middle.
  3. Make a well in the middle.
  4. Add a fried egg.
  5. Sprinkle some fresh coriander and spring onion.
  6. Serve with some tea or coffee.
Tips:
  • Instead of aubergine use cubed meat, mushrooms or lentils.
  • Next time I'd probably serve the eggs and aubergine stew on the side as the lahooh becomes soggy in the middle.
  • Serve lahooh with sugar and butter or olive oil and honey.
A-Z breakfast Dishes:

A - Apple Aebleskiver - Denmark
B - Baghrir - Morocco
C - Changua - Colombia
D - Dutch Baby Pancakes - Germany/USA
E - English Breakfast - England
F - French Toast - Canada
G - Griddle/Girdle Scones - Scotland
H - Hafragrautur -  Iceland
I - Idiyappam - India
J - Johnnycakes - Caribbean Islands
K - Khabees - Bahrain

Check out what other Mega Blogging Marathoners have made for Day 12:


   

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